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Making parenting work with a challenging former spouse

| Sep 19, 2019 | Divorce |

When Texas couples with young children get divorced, they need to figure out a way to work together to continue parenting. If the split was amicable, coming up with a parenting plan could be simple. But when the relationship is full of conflicts, negotiating a custody agreement or parenting plan might be a tense, difficult process.

With courts increasingly favoring joint custody, many parents with conflicts will be forced to figure out how to work together to continue raising their children. Parents who do not get along may consider designing a parenting plan that minimizes interactions and prevents further opportunities for discord. If one parent is very difficult and often combative, it’s a good idea to document the interactions. Such information could be presented as evidence in court.

However, parents also need to keep in mind that whatever custody agreement or parenting plan is accepted by the court, the best interests of the child will be paramount. Research suggests that the negative effects of divorce on children stem from conflicting relationships between the parents. At the same time, children of divorce usually benefit the most when they can form deep bonds with both parents.

There are a variety of options for parents who are divorced and need to negotiate a parenting plan or custody agreement. They can use a mediator, a parenting planner or other options to avoid a court battle. Parents might also benefit from a family law attorney’s guidance during this process. The lawyer might offer information about their various options and work with a planner or mediator on behalf of the client.

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