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What should you do if your child wants to live with other parent?

| Jul 12, 2021 | Child Custody And Support |

Divorce can alter your relationship with your child. Acknowledging the need for flexibility can help you to embrace challenges with confidence so you can continue to support your child.

When you decide upon a custody agreement, keep in mind that things may change over time. If your child requests a change of residency and wants to live with your ex, you may feel disheartened. Knowing how to handle this unexpected circumstance may ease your uncertainty.

Practice empathy

Even when your immediate reaction is to express disappointment or disagreement with your child’s decision, try to have empathy. Consider how you would feel if you were in your child’s position. According to Kids Health, validate your child’s feelings and express understanding. Even if you may not agree with your child’s choice, showing empathy may help your child feel heard.

Encourage your child to talk with you about personal feelings and concerns. Work together to identify solutions. Your genuine interest and concern may help preserve your relationship with your child.

Enforce communication

Depending on the relationship you have with your child, you may notice a decline in the way your child treats you when a change of residency occurs. Additionally, if your ex manipulates your child into believing false information, your child may start to form strong opinions against you. Despite such challenges, express your expectations to your child regarding communication. Talk about the importance of respect and following the rules even amidst differences in opinion.

Your willingness to continue showing unconditional love may help your child to maintain respect for you. Keeping a neutral stance and treating your child and your ex cordially may help you preserve your integrity which can benefit the relationships that mean the most to you.

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